ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

A+| A| A-

Living with Terrorism

Living with Terrorism The bomb-per-day routine of violence, whether in Hyderabad, Guwahati or other parts of the country, is becoming a part of our quotidian existence which many among the populace are forced to reconcile themselves to. Some observers argue that terrorism has to run its course and reach its logical end of failure, from internal fatigue or external circum stances.

Living with Terrorism The bomb-per-day routine of violence, whether in Hyderabad, Guwahati or other parts of the country, is becoming a part of our quotidian existence which many among the populace are forced to reconcile themselves to. Some observers argue that terrorism has to run its course and reach its logical end of failure, from internal fatigue or external circum stances. Among others who do not want to leave it to fate, the views vary from demands for increased militaristic measures and draconian laws to destroy terrorism, to appeals for addressing the basic grievances of the distressed sections of our people that drive them into the laps of terrorists.

Meanwhile, the vast masses find no way to cope with this threat of unpredictability in their daily existence. In militancy-affected areas like Kashmir and the north-east, they have got used to placating the terrorists by giving them shelter or protection money. But such propitiation does not ensure their safety. They may be blown up by a bomb planted in a marketplace or in a train in any part of the country by the same militant group which they might have sheltered. Gratitude to individual protectors and concern for the safety of the non-combatant masses do not figure in the overall strategy of the United Liberation Front of Asom (ULFA), which is purportedly fighting for a pure-blooded Assamese homeland, or in the various armed outfits, which are dedicated to the creation of an Islamic utopia in Kashmir. Unable to aim at those whom they consider their arch-enemies (who are protected by the state with a tight ring of security), they find soft targets in schoolchildren, migrant labourers, railway/air travellers, people in public parks and shoppers in busy marketplaces – treating them as pawns in bargaining with the state over their demands.

Dear Reader,

To continue reading, become a subscriber.

Explore our attractive subscription offers.

Click here

Back to Top