ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

BankingSubscribe to Banking

‘On-tap’ Bank Licences

Critically evaluating the draft guidelines for “on-tap” bank licences put up by the Reserve Bank of India, it is argued that India’s banking system is already sufficiently competitive, and there appear to be few who would be willing to enter the banking business. Entry of newer players, especially those with corporate backing, cannot be the priority at the moment. The priority over the next two or three years has to be the resolution of the non-performing assets problem and strengthening of the existing players.

Financial Sector Reforms

Unified Financial Code: Is India Ready? A Critique on the Financial Sector Legislative Reforms Commission Report by S S Tarapore; Gurgaon: LexisNexis, 2015; pp xii+166, ₹295.

Delinking Housing Cycles, Banking Crises, and Recession

The nexus of housing boom-busts, banking crises, and economic cycles is not unique to the last crisis and has been increasingly present in each of the major banking crises since the break-up of Bretton Woods in the early 1970s. Housing is a politically charged issue. A safer housing market, via planned fiscal intervention to steady supply, would do more to make the financial system safer than all of the other recent initiatives put together. Cheaper finance without cheaper homes only deepens housing inequality.

Do Foreign Banks in India Indulge in 'Cream Skimming'?

Foreign banks in developing countries are often found to indulge in "cream skimming," a lending strategy that targets only wealthy segments of the credit market and excludes small and marginal borrowers from the general pool of borrowers. This paper attempts to investigate whether lending patterns of foreign banks in urban regions of Indian states are indicative of such practices. Using credit data on urban regions of 21 states of India for 1999-2011, this paper finds empirical evidence of cream skimming by foreign banks in India.

Procyclical Credit Growth and Bank NPAs in India

Despite recent monetary policy accommodation, bank credit growth continues to decelerate in India, partly due to huge non-performing asset overhangs in banks. This paper explores various issues related to surging NPAs in banks and observes that excessive credit growth in the past is a major reason that has led to current NPAs. Other factors such as contemporary economic conditions, capital adequacy and overall levels of efficiency of the banks have also affected the incidence of NPAs. For promoting financial stability and enhancing monetary policy effectiveness, it is suggested that macro-prudential aspects such as counter-cyclical capital buffer and dynamic provisioning need to be strengthened. There is also a need to explore if corporate governance concerns could be instrumental in adversely impacting the loan book of state-owned banks.

The Changing Face of Indian Banking

Indian banking is passing through its most severe period of stress in over a decade. It is important, however, not to draw conclusions for banking policy from a snapshot of the most recent period--the totality of the post-reform experience must be taken into account. That larger experience shows that India's public sector-dominated banking system has served the economy well by improving its performance in respect of both efficiency and stability. Looking ahead, changes in governance and management are required, but it is possible to effect these within the framework of public ownership.

Financial Reforms in an Endogenous Money Economy

An examination of the Reserve Bank of India's monetary policy leaves little doubt that India can be suitably characterised as an endogenous money economy. In an endogenous money environment, financial reforms will prove ineffective in stimulating credit supply to large commercial borrowers. They may, however, prove counterproductive by sharpening the credit constraints faced by agricultural and other petty producers in the economy.

Fatal Flaw in Private Banking Systems

It is in the interest of banks to expand the supply of credit, and most banking regulations are designed to limit this tendency. It is in the interest of private bank managers to give in to this tendency (in self-interest) and provide credit indiscriminately, irrespective of macroeconomic considerations, as the 2007 crisis has shown. Perhaps we could all learn from India’s risk-averse public sector banks, which are stressed from time to time, but have never seen multiple bank failures. 

 

Structural Deterioration of Banking Development

The Reserve Bank seems to be stuck between the two stools of reform and facing structural disabilities. It is being forced to accept the trend towards 'universal banking', despite its expressed misgivings. Worse, serious structural deterioration has occurred in the pattern of banking development.

Aspects of Banking Sector Reforms in India

This paper examines some of the consequences of the banking sector reforms in India which were an integral part of the liberalisation process of the economy initiated in 1992. In particular, the data show that, in the post-reform period, investment in government securities by banks has remained persistently high and there has been a significant reduction in the flow of credit (as a proportion of deposits) to the real sectors of the economy. There have also been significant changes in the flow of credit to various groups and sectors within the economy, some of which might be thought not to be in conformity with the stated social goals of the government.

Leadership in Banking

Public sector banks may have succeeded in shedding the excess flab of their workforce, but the malaise lies deeper in the upper echelons of administration. More often than not, chairmen are ill-equipped to meet radical demands of a techno-rich age, and move jobs too quickly to bring about long-lasting change.

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