ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Region without Regionalism

Three decades have passed since the inception of the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation. It still is virtually a non-starter and has not addressed any substantive issue. Intra-regional trade is minuscule. India and Pakistan show little interest in the organisation. Without judging their respective foreign policies, it is argued that South Asian regionalism is not on their agenda. Three questions arise: Is South Asia at all a region? How much does the strategic divide between India and Pakistan, with China factored in, come in the way of South Asian regionalism? Why should India bother about regionalism when its policy of bilateralism serves it fine? To probe these, the region's history, global perceptions of the region, India's foreign and educational practices, and interstate relationships are discussed.

India's Negotiating Strategy for Cancun

With less than three weeks left for the Cancun ministerial meeting and negotiations having entered the critical phase this week at the William Rappard Centre that houses the WTO in Geneva, it is time to take a look at how India's negotiating positions are shaping up.

Failure of Globalisation Theory

The Follies of Globalisation Theory by Justin Rosenberg; Verso, London, 2000; p 205, hardback $ 23.

Dialectics on Power

Gautam Sen’s ‘Opinion’ piece, ‘Indian foreign policy: a power political interpretation’ (EPW, January 13-19) is anchored in the ‘realist’ imaginary of canonical International Relations – ‘power, security, survival and dominance’. But his sinister architecture of the regional and global political spaces threateningly encircling a nuclear Indian, which lamentably self wills its external enfeeblement and dependence, rests on a own curious even violent yoking of disparate developments, half truths and outright fictions, innuendoes and sweeping judgments.

Friends, Foes and Understanding

The language of political economy, international relations and almost the entire range of social sciences remain trapped in metaphors of fear and anxiety that in turn have led to a security-centric universe. Dialogue, a critically existential encounter and an ethical attitude are ruled out. The need then is to go beyond the authoritarian texts and their 'anthropological truths' to find out how in a world rife with contentious politics, themes of dialogue, trust and accommodation can work themselves out.

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