ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Suicide by Maharashtra Farmers

The present paper relies on the census survey of the suicide-affected farmers’ households from the two most vulnerable districts of Maharashtra from 2014 to 2017 when the largest number of farmers’ suicide cases was reported after the 2008 farm debt waivers. A complex mix of social, economic, and psychological factors
play their role in translating into farmers’ suicide. The study covers the districts of Usmanabad from Marathwada and Yavatmal from the Vidarbha region of Maharashtra, respectively. 

Why India Needs a Coal Mines Environment Authority

Given India’s continued dependence on coal to supply power for industrial and residential consumers at affordable prices, the country needs a unified coal mines environment authority staffed with multidisciplinary expertise to assess and minimise the adverse environmental impacts of coal mines with an integrated approach to ensure more efficient, effective, and transparent environmental governance. This authority must be created by enacting a sustainable coal mining bill before private sector commercial coal mines commence operations.

 

Karnataka’s ‘Surya Raitha’ Experiment

Solar-powered irrigation has expanded in India at an unprecedented pace—the number of solar irrigation pumps—from less than 4,000 in 2012 to more than 2,50,000 by 2019. It has been argued that besides giving farmers an additional and reliable source of income, grid-connected SIPs also incentivise efficient energy and water use—critical for sustaining groundwater irrigation. The Surya Raitha scheme was the country’s first, state-driven initiative for solarisation of agriculture feeders by replacing subsidy-guzzling, inefficient electric pumps with energy-efficient, net-metered SIPs. An early appraisal of Surya Raitha lauded the scheme as a smart initiative and argued that it could set an example for promoting solar power as a remunerative crop. However, the scheme was eventually executed as a single feeder pilot with some design changes in Nalahalli panchayat from 2015–18. The authors visited the pilot in 2017–18 and 2018–19 to assess if it had delivered the promises of Surya Raitha scheme. The results are a mixed bag and offer important lessons for implementation and scaling out of component C of the Government of India’s Pradhan Mantri Kisan Urja Suraksha evam Utthaan Mahabhiyan policy.

 

Migrant Children and ‘Free’ Education in India

Schooling of migrant children in India is compromised for various reasons, such as their mobility, disadvantaged backgrounds, and exclusionary experiences of schooling. Such contexts and experiences of migrant families and children are in stark contrast to how their aspirations and motivation are dominantly imagined by education functionaries of the state and the non-governmental organisations. Using narratives from the city of Bengaluru, this article throws light on the aforesaid discord, thereby highlighting the complex placement of migrant children with respect to inclusionary frameworks of schooling and education in India.

Dichotomies of Categorisation of Denotified Tribes: Reflections from Karnataka

Historically, Karnataka has made a bold attempt to include various castes, races, tribes while creating its unified scheduled caste category. Around 101 communities, including denotified, nomadic and semi-nomadic tribes, were included in the existing Scheduled Caste list along with “ex-untouchable” communities. The diversity of castes, tribes, and races included in the Scheduled Caste list created various challenges to public policy interventions related to the provision of reservation in politics, employment, and educational opportunities. This article traces the complex journey of inclusion of denotified tribes to the Scheduled Caste list through a colonial and postcolonial policy narrative and its challenges.

Politics of Caste-based Schemes

Governmentalising schemes in favour of a privileged caste defeats the principle of justice.

 

Workers’ Protest amidst Industrial Apathy

The Wistron workers’ protest turning violent is indicative of deeper fissures in industrial relations.

Tribal Rights and Heritage Conservation in the Western Ghats of Karnataka

In the context of Karnataka, the implementation of the Scheduled Tribes and Other Traditional Forest Dwellers (Recognition of Forest Rights) Act, 2006 in the heritage sites of the Western Ghats makes for an important case study of how the concerns of tribals and indigenous people are often marginalised in the debates around conservation. Analysing the process of assigning heritage status to the sites located in the state, reports of government committees on the conservation and global studies show that conservation models that vouched for exclusion of human habitants in ecologically sensitive areas failed to conserve biodiversity. Hence, the adoption of an inclusive and participatory approach is the need of the hour.

Are Linguistic Nationalisms Killing South Indian Federalism?

Linguistic nationalism has, for long, been considered a measure to check Hindi domination in the Indian Union. This paper seeks to explore how, paradoxically, linguistic nationalism can often fuel antagonisms between groups that have negotiated space and politics through multiple cultural registers. Using the case of a recent Kannada film, Sarkari Hi Pra Shaale Kasaragodu , the paper illustrates how multilingualism and pre-existing federalisms could be under threat from contesting chauvinisms.

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