ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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A Companion to Rāmcaritmānas

Reading the Rāmcaritmānas: A Companion to the Awadhi Ramayana of Tulsidas by Rupert Snell with Neha Tiwari, Delhi: Primus Books, 2023; pp xxiii + 503, `1,995.

Gaddar (1949–2023)

Gaddar was a remarkable artist who used his music and literature to transform society and raise awareness about people’s rights. His social background gave him a deep insight into oppression of all kinds and how to challenge them effectively. By combining art with a revolutionary ideology, the impact of his life and work will continue to resonate for generations in the Telugu-speaking regions and beyond.

Fiscal Marksmanship in Health Expenditure

There is a dearth of literature about fi scal marksmanship beyond total revenue expenditures and defi cits at the central or state level. It is of utmost importance to elicit a debate on the budgetary discipline around micro variables. These micro-level deviations result in macro-level errors in budget forecasting. The article explores state-level fi scal marksmanship in the context of medical and public health expenditure over the period—2002 to 2017. The deviations in capital health spending are high compared to those in revenue health spending. This may have an impact on the improvement in health over the long term.

Short Stories on Precarity

Field Notes from a Waterborne Land: Bengal Beyond the Bhadralok by Parimal Bhattacharya, New Delhi: HarperCollins India, 2022; pp 312, `499 (paperback).

Miya Poetry

Miya poetry is a genre of poems written by Bengal-origin Muslims that highlight the angst of a community that has struggled hard to integrate and assimilate with the larger Axamiya society. In this paper I argue that an analysis of Miya poetry must be placed within the larger context of identity contestation of Bengal-origin Muslims. Accordingly, Miya poetry seeks to stabilise the contested identity of this community by reappropriating the stigmatised social identity of Miya.

 

Publishing Pulp and the Popular

Indian Genre Fiction: Pasts and Future Histories edited by Bodhisattva Chattopadhyay, Aakriti Mandhwani, Anwesha Maity, New York and Oxon: Routledge, 2019;
pp xii + 211, 
`750.

Adventure Comics and Youth Culture in India by Raminder Kaur and Saif Eqbal, New York and Oxon: Routledge, 2019; pp xiv + 225, `995.

 

Namdeo Dhasal’s New Language- A reflection of the conscience of the oppressed

Marathi poet Namdeo Dhasal challenged Brahminical literature and sought to reconstruct a caste-less society through his works.

Roars of Dalit Audacity

Moustache, a scathing commentary on Brahminical ritual purity, tells the story of a Dalit protagonist with the “audacity” for bodily grooming.

 

End of the Postcolonial State

Much of the scholarship on Bangladesh’s founding places it within a narrative of repetition. It either repeats the partitions of 1905 or 1947 or the creation of India and Pakistan as postcolonial states. This paper argues instead for the novelty of Bangladesh’s creation against the postcolonial state, suggesting that it opened up a new history at the global level in which decolonisation was replaced by civil war as the founding narrative for new states.

 

Beyond the Break with the Past

In the 1940s, Bengali Muslim intellectuals sought to find a new autonomy in a comprehensive break with the texts and language of the Hindu-dominated literature of the “Bengal Renaissance.” But within a few years of Pakistan’s founding, a new generation argued that disavowing the past was not libe

Collision amid Collusion and Cooperation

This paper examines the history of largely understudied women’s rights activists in the early years of East Pakistan. While they collided with West Pakistani activists—and the central state—on matters of culture, identity, and political and economic issues, they actively cooperated with West Pakistani counterparts to fight gender discrimination and to demand reform in women’s rights from the state.

 

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