ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Rising Caesarean Births

India’s rising rate of caesarean births is a cause for concern and signals the need for strategies to deal with it. Adverse outcomes of caesarean births include high risk of maternal and neonatal death, various maternal morbidities including infections, need for blood transfusion, neonatal morbidities related to iatrogenic prematurity, and potential complications in subsequent pregnancies.

NEET Could Undo Tamil Nadu's Achievements in Public Health

Tamil Nadu has performed extremely well in most health indicators because creative technical intervention in the state has been coupled with social mobilisation. The National Eligibility cum Entrance Test ( NEET) has the potential to reverse all past achievements—the innovative reservation policies and the incentive structure which ensured a seamless flow of health personnel in rural areas.

Punjab’s Drug Problem

Younger persons have been the worst sufferers of the illicit drugs trade in Punjab. Although contrabands have spread their tentacles in all parts, the scourge of drugs has been concentrated in certain localities, clusters, and villages. The demand for illicit drugs in Punjab is largely met from outside the state through a supply network controlled by the local, interstate, and international drug traffi ckers.

Reducing Suicides

Prevalence of suicide in India is a public health issue and must be addressed as one.

Dead Weight of Healthcare

Majhi's tragic tale of carrying his dead wife reminds us of the pathetic state of health in India.

A Crisis of Plenty

The poor in India have access to surgeries but not basic healthcare.

Arrest of Saibal Jana

Medico Friend Circle (MFC), a national level network of health professionals and activists, are shocked and pained by the arrest and detention of its long-standing, senior member—Doctor Saibal Jana.

Risk of Intimate Partner Violence and Alcohol Use

This response to "Domestic Violence and Effectiveness of Law Enforcement Agencies: A Panel Data Study" (EPW, 16 January 2016) supports the recommendation to increase quantitative research efforts in the field and apply evidence-based policy to reduce violence against women. As an example, the article presents an epidemiological analysis of alcohol as an important risk factor for intimate partner violence against women in India.

Cleaning Up the Pharma Industry

For over 30 years pharmaceutical companies have been selling fixed-dose combination drugs with scant need to justify their efficacy, safety or rationality for use. The Government of India has finally banned 344 such drugs, though pharma companies have been able to obtain interim judicial stay orders. It is hoped that the courts take into account the serious public health implications of the sale of certain drugs and allow regulatory intervention banning uncertified combination drugs, including codeine-based cough syrups and various cold and flu drugs.

Politics of Medical Education in India

The impoverishment within the public health system is in stark contrast to the phenomenal rise of private healthcare, its international standards, medical tourism and its focus on servicing the rich. A meaningful change within medical education and the public health system, both predictors of healthcare delivery and of national standards of health, seems to be light years away. While the challenge of reforming medical education in India requires a revolution, much of the debate refuses to identify the elephant in the room, that is, the politics of medical education and public health.

Combating Dengue in India

The limited official data available on dengue in India fails to define its epidemiological profiles. However, it reveals how little has been done in the surveillance of this disease at the level of the states, and gives an idea of the quantum of effort required to fight dengue. The National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme faces some classic pitfalls in India with its implementation not mandatory in the states. Arguments about the number of cases and hospitalisation, both with wide ranges, persist. Applying integrated action plans at the district level in the states would have helped. Improvement of the system of public health services, strengthening skills of medical personnel, active surveillance components with a well-functioning surveillance system, enhancement or creation of suitable water distribution network and garbage collection are critical components of an integrated plan.

Role of Private Sector in Medical Education and Human Resource Development for Health in India

This paper examines the growth and regional spread of medical education in India, particularly in the private sector. An important feature of the considerable growth of medical education, especially after the 1990s, has been the setting up of numerous private medical colleges in the country. Interestingly, this growth has occurred primarily in the more developed states with better health outcomes, while the low-income states with poor health indicators have lagged behind. This unequal distribution of medical colleges has had an impact on the availability of medical services and has resulted in regional differences in access to doctors in the country.

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