ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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The Wounds of Remission

The release of Bilkis Bano’s tormenters puts a question mark on the provision of remitting the convicts.

Lawless Laws and the Supreme Court

The Supreme Court’s blessing for the PMLA shows its contempt for human rights and the Constitution.

Indian Courts and the Politics of Recognising Women’s Unpaid Care Work

In this episode, we speak to Prabha Kotiswaran about how Indian courts value women's unpaid domestic work.

Does the Court Tame the Government?

The Court needs to devise more effective ways to make the government accountable to citizen’s rights.

 

The Plight of Street Vendors in India

Street vendors constitute the most significant and deprived segment of the country’s unorganised sector. Among vendors, the condition of Dalit, women, and child vendors is the most horrific, depressed, and necessitous. Other than being a source of self-employment for the poor, vending is vital to provide convenient, affordable services to the urban populace. It is ironic that the current laws, schemes, and policies are awfully unsympathetic, hostile, and unreceptive towards the ordeals of this section of the urban population. This paper attempts to explore and expose the vulnerability, fragility, and marginalisation of this section under faulty urban governance and development practices by tracking their lives, pains, and plight as vendors.

 

The New Judicial Amendment to SC/ST (Prevention of Atrocities) Act

The Supreme Court in March 2020 passed a judgment that diluted the Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes (Prevention of Atrocities) Act, 1989. The judgment was passed under the pretext of protecting innocent persons from being booked under false cases, thereby preventing the misuse of the law.

Why Should the Marital Rape Exception be Removed?

The marital rape exception must be removed as it is no longer legally tenable in light of the Supreme Court decisions in various cases. Contrary to arguments that the central government has advanced repeatedly, these decisions hold that marriage does not mean there is irrevocable consent for sexual intercourse, and that a regressive practice cannot be used to ensure the stability of marriage.

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